One year of millennial money

It’s been one year since I started writing for millennials and, to mark this occasion, I wanted to take a look back and see which pieces sparked the most interest among my generational peers.

This meant taking a deep dive into our website data to find out what millennials have been reading, what videos they have been watching and which podcasts they have listened to. I had a lot of questions and here are my answers…

‘It’s a widely-held belief that millennials are obsessed with money. And it’s also wildly true. Just don’t mistake it for a fixation with getting rich.’ – Chelsea Clinton, author and daughter of former U.S. President Bill Clinton

What did millennials want to read more about?

First I decided to take a look on a site-wide basis, at which topics and articles, millennial or not, millennials took an interest in.

It was overwhelmingly the first woman to become president of the European Central Bank, Christine Lagarde. Next up was security versus growth. These topics couldn’t be more different, but I have a feeling the word ‘security’ jumped off the screen. When it came to the millennial-specific pieces it was clear that trends and themes were popular. The three most read* related to healthy living, world water week and the future of gaming.

Were millennials more interested in videos or podcasts?

This is a slightly unfair comparison as our podcast series only launched in May 2019 and FundCalibre’s videos are long-established, but I wanted to see if the data matched my preferences.

At first glance, millennials prefer videos with 57%** of views compared with 36%** of podcast listens. Unfortunately, podcasts proved too difficult to narrow down on an episode by episode basis since the information is kept on a variety of platforms, but I did have a look at videos.

The most popular** video in terms of views was our plastic free July interview, although that was also the most viewed overall by all age groups. Putting that to one side, the second most viewed** was investing in specialist assets with VT Seneca Diversified Income. Although interestingly, if you look at the views from millennials as a percentage of the total instead, the most interest was sparked by our two part series with Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust, with each attracting 65%** of views from millennials.

The most viewed* Elite Rated funds?

First and second place didn’t surprise me: Baillie Gifford Global Discovery and AXA Framlington Global Technology respectively. The former was top in our ‘most viewed by millennials’ piece when we looked back over the calendar year 2018. And technology is a popular investment among my millennial colleagues in the office. But some of the other names in the top 10 might:

  1. Baillie Gifford Global Discovery
  2. AXA Framlington Global Technology
  3. Jupiter European
  4. Baillie Gifford Strategic Bond
  5. City of London Investment Trust
  6. Smith & Williamson Artificial Intelligence
  7. Henderson UK Property
  8. Fidelity Global Dividend
  9. GAM Star Credit Opportunities & VT Gravis UK Infrastructure Income
  10. Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust

Are millennials interested in investment trusts?

This question answered itself. From the high amount of interest in our videos with Tom Slater at Scottish Mortgage, to City of London as the fifth most viewed. But for fun, I expanded to look at the top 20 most viewed*, I found three more trusts. The data seems to present a good case for investment trusts and millennials, after all they could make you a millennial millionaire in the future.

 

*FundCalibre data, ages 18-34, 30 Oct 2018 to 16 Oct 2019
**FundCalibre data, ages 18-34, 1 May 2019 to 15 Oct 2019

The views of the author and any people interviewed are their own and do not constitute financial advice. However the knowledge that professional analysts have analysed a fund or trust in depth before assigning them a rating can be a valuable additional filter for anyone looking to make their own decisions. Before you make any investment decision make sure you’re comfortable and fully understand the risks. If you invest in fund or trust make sure you know what specific risks they’re exposed to. Past performance is not a reliable guide to future returns. Remember all investments can fall in value as well as rise, so you could make a loss.