Schroder Tokyo loses Elite Rating as manager retires

After a very successful career, Andrew Rose, manager of Schroder Tokyo fund, has retired.
A lifelong Schroders’ man, he joined the company in 1981 and held a number of positions within the company, including head of Japanese equities from 2001 until 2006 in Tokyo. Since 1999 he has been based in London as joint head of the Japanese equity team, with overall responsibility for smaller company investment in Japan.

Schroder Tokyo was launched in 1989 and has had only two managers during its lifetime. On 1 July 2019 its management passes to its third manager, Masaki Taketsume.

Masaki has worked at Schroders since 2007, as a member of its Japanese equity team, initially as a technology analyst and then a fund manager. He began his career in investment as Nikko Asset Management in 1994 before working as a fund manager at Deutsche Trust Bank in 1998.

Nicky Richards, global head of equities at Schroders, commented: “Andrew is one of the most respected and long-standing Japanese equity fund managers in the industry, we would like to thank him for his commitment to Schroders and our clients during his successful 38-year career.

“Masaki is ideally placed to take on Andrew’s fund management responsibilities. We are confident that Masaki’s fund management expertise, supported by Nathan Gibbs and the wider Japanese equities team, will ensure investment continuity for our clients.”

Masaki added: “Having worked closely with Andrew for the past five years I am excited about the prospect of continuing the investment approach, process and style which has served our clients well over the long-term.”

Darius McDermott, managing director of FundCalibre added: “Andrew has been a very successful Japanese equity manager. Unfortunately, as the new manager does not have the minimum three-year tenure on the fund to pass our screening process, the fund must lose its Elite Rating.

“We wish Andrew all the best for his retirement.”

The views of the author and any people interviewed are their own and do not constitute financial advice. However the knowledge that professional analysts have analysed a fund or trust in depth before assigning them a rating can be a valuable additional filter for anyone looking to make their own decisions. Before you make any investment decision make sure you’re comfortable and fully understand the risks. If you invest in fund or trust make sure you know what specific risks they’re exposed to. Past performance is not a reliable guide to future returns. Remember all investments can fall in value as well as rise, so you could make a loss.